Root directory residuals

root-directory-residualsThe only directory in my file system that I’d like to keep track of is my home directory. Here I keep my personal files and the a number of configurations that I love. I write notes of any configuration edits I make and record them here. However, besides the system configurations that I have edited, I also have a few more root directory configurations that I created. I wanted a way to keep track of them.

Getting down with the O C D

Previously I choose to reinstall about every six to twelve months. This allowed me to examine the install process to see if there were any new details about the operating system that I needed to learn. However, doing this procedure caused me to lose some good details I had put in the configurations. After I did this a few times, I began to do backups of them.

To keep the system running as expected, I learned I had to keep track of my configurations. The system configurations that I had edited originally I could keep track of by package updates (where I have to regularly merge the new versions to the old). However for the system configurations I created, I pretty much forgot them. These files occasionally I would rediscover when I had to do some troubleshooting. I came to the conclusion that if I wanted to track them, the best way to do so was to put them in a package`.

(I choose now to avoid installs when I can. These days, researching the install guide is enough to keep me up-to-date of operating system changes.)

Hunter and gatherer

I wasn’t always good at recording what configurations I created — I would test something out, or get excited when an experiment worked… Therefore, I had to search through the file system to re-track these files. This involved me making a list of all the files in the file system and comparing that to a list of files of the packages themselves. This sounds like a laborious process but isn’t terribly difficult and can be trimmed down greatly.

Because configurations are generally only in several directories less searching is required.

A file list of all packages, can be created with:

for p in $(pacman -Qq); do pacman -Qql $p; done | sed 's#/$##g' | sort -u -o pkgs-filelist.txt

A file list of the root directory, can be created with:

find / -not -path "/dev/*" -not -path "/home/*" -not -path "/media/*" -not -path "/mnt/*" -not -path "/proc/*" -not -path "/root/*" -not -path "/run/*" -not -path "/srv/*" -not -path "/sys/*" -not -path "/tmp/*" -not -path "/var/cache/*"  -not -path "/var/lib/pacman/*" -not -path "/var/lib/systemd/*" -not -path "/var/log/journal/*" -not -path "/var/tmp/*" | sed 's#/$##g' | sort -u -o root-filelist.txt

The differences can be viewed with:

vimdiff pkgs-filelist.txt root-filelist.txt

The package please… emmhh!

Creating a configuration package is the same as creating any other package. I put the configurations in the PKGBUILD directory and in it directed where to install them. In the future if an edit is required, I edit them there and rebuild it.

pkgbuild