xuserrun – Run a command on the currently-active user’s X.org server display

xuserrun is a bash script to run a command on the active X.org server display.  This is primarily necessary if from within another environment  (different user, console, cron, boot script…).  xuserrun gathers DISPLAY and user environmental variables via systemd and passes them on to be able to dothis. xuserrun is designed for use with only a single user X.org server display. Running it is basic:

xuserrun xclock -digital

Tto put out a notification:

xuserrun notify-send "Hello, Dave."

It’s available for Arch users in the AUR and is also downloadable on github.

Audio file encode to a video file

I wanted to convert an MP3 file to a video file to be able to use it on my PS3. The PS3 has an audio player but it doesn’t remember the position. It was an audiobook so it was best for me to convert it to a video file.

#!/usr/bin/bash
# Create video file from audio file.

# Required programs.
if ! hash ffmpeg 2>&- ; then
  echo "Requires program: ffmpeg"; exit 1; fi

# Usage.
if [ $# != 2 ] ; then
    echo "${0##*/} <image> <audio> - create video file from an audio file."
    exit 1; fi

# Files existent test.
if [ ! -f "$1" ] ; then
    echo "non-existent image: "$1""
    exit 1; fi
if [ ! -f "$2" ] ; then
    echo "non-existant audio: "$2""
    exit 1; fi

vid_nme="${2%.*}".mp4
ffmpeg -f image2 -loop 1 -i "$1" -i "$2" -c:v libx264 -tune stillimage 
  -c:a copy -strict experimental -shortest "$vid_nme"

#ffmpeg -f image2 -loop 1 -i "$1" -i "$2" -c:v libx264 -tune stillimage 
#  -c:a aac -strict experimental -b:a 192k -shortest "$3".mp4

Disk and Memory Usage Scripts

At times I like to check my levels of disk and memory usage and it’s more available for me at times for me to do it from the command line. Therefore, I created two scripts for them:

$ devtop 
Filesystem  Size  Used  Avail  Use%  Mounted
/dev/sda1   291G  101G  187G   36%   /
/dev/sda2   166G   38G  121G   24%   /home

$ memtop
PROGRAM          %MEM  #MEM
firefox          14.0  1049.7 MiB
gnome-shell      2.2   165.84 MiB
thunderbird      1.9   143.773 MiB
gedit            0.8   63.8555 MiB
nautilus         0.6   44.9961 MiB
Xorg             0.5   38.5039 MiB
gnome-terminal-  0.3   28.8164 MiB
keepassx         0.3   27.6406 MiB
tracker-extract  0.2   21.1992 MiB

Both script are part of my genscripts-git that is in the Arch Linux User Repository.

Regular videos convert for PSP viewing



I like to put videos on my PSP` to watch later. To be able to remember the options I put this in a bash script.

pspvidconv [-d*] <dir.*> <video(s)> — convert videos to PSP

The PSP allows the creation/use of a supplementary single-depth directory. The directory option (-d) will ask if the user wants to create a new directory, if the answer is no, it will present the existing folders.

#!/usr/bin/bash
# Convert videos to PSP

# Settings
vid_dir=/run/media/$USER/PSP/VIDEO  # For Gnome 3, Gnome 2: /media/PSP/VIDEO
vid_vcd="-vcodec mpeg4 -vtag xvid"  # Video codec: xvid
vid_vcd="-vcodec libx264"           # Video codec: x264
vid_vcd="-vcodec h264"
vid_res=320x240                     # 320x240 for PSP 1001, 480x272 for 2001
vid_vbr=768k                        # Video bit rate, was 1024
vid_vfr=29.97                       # Video frame rate
vid_acd=aac                         # Audio codec to use (libfaac for some)
vid_aab=64k                         # Audio bit rate
vid_aar=48000                       # Audio sampling frequency
vid_aac=2                           # Audio number of channels
fns_snd=/usr/share/sounds/alsa/Front_Center.wav

# Usage
if [[ -z "$@" ]]; then
  echo "${0##*/} [-d*] <dir.*> <video(s)> — convert videos to PSP"
  exit
fi

# Check that PSP is plugged in
if [ ! -d $vid_dir ]; then
  echo "It appears that the PSP is not plugged in, no "$vid_dir"."
  exit
fi

# Use sub-directory
if [ "$1" == "-d" ]; then
  while true; do
    read -p " Create a new directory? (y/n): " yn
    case $yn in
      [Yy] )  read -p " Directory name (no spaces): " newdir
              vid_dir="$vid_dir"/"$newdir"
              mkdir "$vid_dir" && break 2;;
      [Nn] )  printf " Select PSP VIDEO sub-directory:n"
              select vid_sub in "$vid_dir"/*/
                do
                  vid_dir="$vid_sub"
                  test -n "$vid_dir" && break 2
                  echo " Select 1, 2, ..."
                done ;;
      * )     echo " Answer (y)es or (n)o."
    esac
  done
  shift
fi

# Check if selection(s) exists
for vid in "$@"; do
  if [ ! -f "$vid" ]; then
    echo " Selection ""$vid"" does not exist."
    exit
  fi
done

# Convert, save to PSP video directory
for vid in "$@"; do
  vid_out="${vid/:/-}"            # ffmpeg not allowing outputs of ':', '?'
  vid_out="${vid_out/?/}"        # http://tinyurl.com/ffmpeg-filename-colon
  #vid_out="${vid_out%.*}"-PSP.mp4 # Append '-PSP' to filename
  thm_out="${vid_out%.*}".thm
  # Encode video
  ffmpeg -i file:"$vid" $(printf '%s' "$vid_vcd") -s "$vid_res" -b:v "$vid_vbr" -r "$vid_vfr" -acodec "$vid_acd" -b:a "$vid_aab" -ar "$vid_aar" -ac "$vid_aac" -f psp -strict -2 -y "$vid_dir"/"$vid_out"
  # Create thumbnail
  ffmpeg -i file:"$vid" -f image2 -ss 50 -vframes 1 -s 160x120 "$vid_dir"/"$thm_out"
done && aplay "$fns_snd"

Pandoc-flavored markdown: Perfect!

I’d been looking for a way to convert my notes to webpages. Typically I wrote my notes in .txt form and then went through them and added links, formatting… when I was ready to blog them. Recently, I had asked StackOverflow if I could convert MediaWiki format to HTML. I’m an Administrator for the Arch Wiki so I’m very familiar writing this format. This is when I learned about pandoc. Pandoc’s author describes pandoc as, “If you need to convert files from one markup format into another, pandoc is your swiss-army knife…“.

Plain Text Example

I planned to write my notes in mediawiki format and then convert to HTML, however I’d been using StackOverflow lately and started to learn Markdown Prose and really like it. Markdown’s is designed to be easy to write and read: “Markdown is a text-to-HTML conversion tool for web writers. Markdown allows you to write using an easy-to-read, easy-to-write plain text format, then convert it to structurally valid XHTML (or HTML)“. Markdown is so easy to write that it makes sense that sites like StackOverflow and GitHub are using it.

Markdown, Markup Languange

Pandoc has extended markdown to use code blocks ```, tables, and a few other things and converting is very basic:

pandoc file.md -o file.htm

I’m in love, I’m in love, I’m in love :), as it will save me a good bit of time in editing/creating Documentation. Tomorrow, I’ll post a bash script to clean up the HTML to be able to put it in a WordPress Blog.

(ar)ch (pa)ckages – a generic package tasks script for Arch Linux

I once saw a wrapper-script for pacman in the forums that was basically a short-hand version of common pacman tasks. I thought this was a good idea and over the last couple years, I’ve expanded on it. It does just about everything I need it to. It’s real basic and I call it arpa. Here is a basic synopsis:

arpa [option] [*package] - a generic package tasks wrapper script
  -e, --explicit - install a package as explicit
  -g, --get      - get/download package upgrade(s)    : -G get pkg upgrades all
  -i, --install  - install a package                  : -I install as dependency
  -l, --list     - list package files                 : -L list pkgs installed
  -o, --owns     - owning package of a file
  -q, --query    - query for an installed package     : -Q query w/ description
  -r, --remove   - remove a pkg and its deps          : -R force, no argue orphs
  -s, --search   - search for a package               : -S search w/ description
  -u, --upgrade  - upgrade system                     : -U upgrade AUR
  -y, --sync     - sync package db

Good for me to have this around so I can remember everything :), and it is in the AUR.

bashrc

The bash shell’s setting file is a really nice this to have detailed. Therefore I looked into it pretty good. For any that would like to use it, it can be found in the AUR.