Category Archives: GNOME

Geany Set Up as Just a Text Editor

I have lately decided to use Geany as my default text editor. Geany handles text kindly. For a basic person like me it behaves likewise (which I appreciate). Geany is a text editor with IDE features. To display only the text editor part, I had set up Geany before. I am writing it down now to remember the settings, and to share to those who might find it handy.

Settings

General:   Misc:  Always wrap search      check
                  Hide the find dialog    check  # Ctrl + (Shift) + G
Interface: Intr:  Show sidebar          uncheck
           Note:  Show close buttons    uncheck  # Ctrl + W
           Tool:  Show toolbar          uncheck  # a few shortcuts learn
Editor     Feat:  Line wrapping           check
                  Code folding          uncheck  # change later?
                  Line breaking column       80  # typical
           Indn:  Width                       2  # two is good for mult-indnt
           Dspl:  Show line numbers     uncheck  # status bar display
                  Show markers margin   uncheck  # seldom use
                  Long line marker           80
                                        #d1d1d1
Files             Default EOL chars          LF
                  Ensure cons line end    check
                  Strip trailing s&t      check  # i remember easier

The message window I rarely use and can be turned off by doing View > Show Message Window and unchecking.

Key bindings useful to know

file:
  ctrl + n            new
  ctrl + o            open
  ctrl + s            save
  ctrl + shift + s    save as   (added)
  ctrl + w            close
  ctrl + r            reload
editor:
  ctrl + z            undo
  ctrl + y            redo
  ctrl + d            line duplicate
  ctrl + k            line delete
  ctrl + shift + del  eol erase to
  ctrl + shift + bck  bol erase to
  alt  + ↑/↓          line scroll
  alt  + pgup/pgdn    line move
search:
  ctrl + f            find
  ctrl + g            find again
  ctrl + shift + g    find previous
  ctrl + h            replace
go to:
  ctrl + l            line goto
  home                bol  # Left  override
  end                 eol  # right override
tabs:
  ctrl + tab          tab next
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Another look at GNOME menu bar alternatives

Header

After reading a post yesterday that talked about replacing the Gnome’s built-in menu applet, I began thinking why not try out the replacements for my lead-weighted Gnome Menu Bar. One of the few expectancies I have of Gnome or any other UI is to respond nearly instantly to menu selections, and to have all common selections in one interface. Gnome Menu Bar has a hiccup to it so I’d thought I’d take a look at what else is being developed.

Reading Johan’s Blog it’s pointed out that there are really only two alternatives to Gnome’s Menu Bar: slab from Novell/Suse (aka Gnome Main Menu) and Gimmie.

Gimmie

Gimmie reminds me alot of an application called dragthing way back on Mac OS:

Gimmie can be used as a panel applet or a separate dock, but the dock I found obstructive and too big so I’m just covering the panel applet.

Gimmie comes by default colored like a Miami night club, “Hello ladies.” But I’m glad there’s an option to not always have it on. They still hover green, blue, pink… but no big deal I guess.

The People and Library tabs contain contacts and the documents most often used. I didn’t look into these very much as I have my own way of organizing ppl and files but they seem like they can be pretty handy.

The Programs tab is what I would most use Gimmie for and it’s categorized conviently like Gnome Menu Bar.

The Linux tab contains everything else, control panels, places, devices and media.

Gimmie has about everything I need and is fast though not as fast as I would like as the rollover effects hang a bit.

  • + quick responsive
  • + nice variation of features
  • – rollover slight drag
  • – big big
  • ? “Linux Tab”?
  • ? Tomboy Notes support?

Slab a.k.a Gnome Main Menu

Gnome Main Menu feels like a trimmed down version of Gimmie and works exactly as it was designed to do: a lighter replacement for Gnome’s Menu Bar. It does take the same load time though (5 to 10 seconds) but once it does it’s nice and responsive. Gnome Main Menu has no applications setup by default – favorites must be added manually. I was hoping applications would get added by the frequency they are used but no luck. So I added my favorites and found that its really nice to be able to start these applications as quickly as I did. Despite this feature being really useful it also becomes a crutch as any applications that are not favorites had to be opened through launching a second window. Gnome Main Menu also creates a folder called Documents in my home directory. Not good. I have my own way of organizing my documents so this didn’t make me happy.

GMM is good in the basics. I like GMM’s hover buttons that give one click behavior over Gimmies double click one. Also, GMM has no preferences which surprisingly didn’t’ disturb me at all as it was well configured.

  • + Light, fast, mean and trim.
  • + easy to learn and use
  • – big size
  • – Document folder – oh boy.

Conclusion

If I were to choose between the two, it would depend on my situation. Gimmie could be useful to beginners who could be sedated by finding most of what they need in the menu while GMM just works nice for basic (8-10) app users that don’t need the frills and likes the speed.

For now though… I’m sticking with Gnome’s Menu Bar. Though it doesn’t preload the menu and sometimes loses the cached icons its still the quickest way I can get to all the apps I need.

Quick Tip: Gnome Menu Bar has a built-in delay when sliding over categories. Add to or create a ~/.gtkrc-2.0 file and add:

vim ~/.gtkrc-2.0
gtk-menu-popup-delay = 0"| tee -a .gtkrc-2.0

for a lower menu delay (does cause a harmless gtk warning)

Gnome Color Chooser applicability chart

Gnome Color Chooser - Color ChartI wrote about configuring the Gnome Color Chooser last week and got my fixing eyes and fingers more into it. The degree to how customizable the Gnome desktop is really incredible if not a bit overbearing. So, I’ve made a reference chart too help me in the future to quicken the process.

For customizing, I use freakcode’s Si Pack here – customizations may vary depending on the theme used.

gnome-color-chooser-color-chart.png

Matched Colors

To carry the theme, these are the colors I matched.

In the Normal section:

I matched the hover fg to Entry hover fg.

In the Entry Fields section:

I matched selected bg to Normal selected fg, selected fg and alt.
selected fg to Normal hover bg.

The alt selected bg matches Normal hover fg.

And the disabled bg also matches the Normal disabled bg.

Sidenote

I’m testing vimpress to write and publish this post. I’ve been studying
this week on vim and this is all very very interesting.