Category Archives: Script

File backups with sequential numbering

I’ve discovered over the years that sometimes I shouldn’t just dive in and edit a file. That, sometimes, I have grand ideas that aren’t so super. I’ve made edits to files, quit and saved them, then ran them as a script, or read them as a document and said, “Oh boy”. So basically, now, I approach editing files cautiously and if I have any doubt they can be flubbed, then first I will do a backup.

When it is the point where I know a file has to be backed up, first thing I do is check and see if there is a _vault directory. In any location where I had to backup a file previously, I created a _vault directory. After the first time I did this I realized that I was going to have to number these file backups. I reasoned that filename_[0-9][0-9] would be an reasonable format. If an extension was there the entire format would be filename_[0-9][0-9].ext.

As this is something I regularly do, I decided to build a script to make this a bit easier. The usage is basic — I define the file and optionally the destination-directory. If the destination directory remains unspecified then the current directory is used. An example:

$ bckfile file.txt _vault
‘file.txt’ -> ‘_vault/file_01.txt’

The limitation of the script is that files can only contain a period if used for the extension. This is a all but necessary as there would be no easy way to determine in a script if a period in a filename is for an extension or actually a part of the filename.

bckfile can be installed for Arch Linux users as part of the AUR package of my general utility scripts: genscripts-git.

gt — a script to create a gedit scratchpad

geditmp—a-script-to-create-a-gedit-scratchpad

I am really lazy with my editors. I have aliases in my shell configuration for gedit and vim to open them as quickly as possible:

alias v="vim -p"
alias sv="sudo vim -p"
alias g="bgcmd gedit"
alias sg="bgcmd gksudo geany"

This is very nice for me because I use my editors quite a bit. One thing I needed though was a command that would create and open a temporary file in gedit. The main reason for this is that, there are times, I don’t know how to name or place the file properly yet. At other times, the reason is I like to have a scratchpad but would rather not lose information if it was just a New File and I forgot about it, or a crash happened.

The bash script

Running geditmp will create and open a file named of the current time (MMDDhhmm) and will be saved in the trash folder. If geditmp is followed by a name (e.g. gt geditmp.md) the name will be appended to the current time.

geditmp-example

The name is helpful if wanting to dig the file out of the trash folder at a later time.

#!/usr/bin/bash
# (g)edit (t)emp. file. Create/open a temporary file(s).

# Variables
tmp_dir=~/.local/share/Trash/files; [ ! -d "$tmp_dir" ] && mkdir -pv "$tmp_dir"
time="$(date +%m%d%H%M)"

# gedit existence test
hash gedit 2>&- || { echo "Requires program \"gedit\"."; exit 1; }

# Help
if [ $# -lt 1 ] || [ "$1" = -h -o "$1" = --help ]; then
  echo "${0##*/} [name1] [name2*]… — gedit temp. file. Create/open a temporary file(s)."
  exit 1
fi

for name in "$@"; do
  nohup gedit "$tmp_dir"/"$time"-"$name" &> /dev/null &
done

xuserrun – Run a command on the currently-active user’s X.org server display

xuserrun is a bash script to run a command on the active X.org server display.  This is primarily necessary if from within another environment  (different user, console, cron, boot script…).  xuserrun gathers DISPLAY and user environmental variables via systemd and passes them on to be able to dothis. xuserrun is designed for use with only a single user X.org server display. Running it is basic:

xuserrun xclock -digital

Tto put out a notification:

xuserrun notify-send "Hello, Dave."

It’s available for Arch users in the AUR and is also downloadable on github.

No-think link (redone)

Retyped… again doneover… Forward thinking file linking.

Screencasting Done Easy (Desktop Recording)

I got to test out a good number of screencasting applications and I found a good one, and as usual the easiest was the best. I started with recordMyDesktop.

recordMyDesktop

recordMyDesktop is a basic program that works good. The GTK version has a simple UI that sets a border around the area to be recorded. I has sound recording too.

A minor thing but of note is that the window detection area is off when selecting a windows, but the reason I didn’t use recordMyDesktop was because I found the quality wasn’t that good. It could be because it uses .ogv format, or perhaps it had something to do with my system.

This is and example I did with recordMyDesktop and though it’s enlarged (OpenShot doesn’t have the ability to use the original size) the quality I wanted to be better.

Others

I tried Istanbul and a couple others all with about the same recording results. Istanbul hasn’t been developed in several years and though I got excited about xvidcap it hasn’t been developed in years either. xvidcap grabs screenshots and then concatenates them into a video. I got excited because xvidcap’s preview uses Imagemagick’s animate tool to preview the video and it was real nice. Unfortunately very little works in xvidcap anymore but taking the screenshots. To put them together I used:

fmpeg -i out%04d.xwd -r 15 -vcodec huffyuv test.avi

unfortunately the quality was no better than that of the others.

FFmpeg

The great command line tool to encode and decode video ffmpeg can also do screencasts and I read a lot of how people liked it (and I do too). To use it it’s real basic:

ffmpeg -f x11grab -s wxga -i :0.0 -sameq screencast.mpg

The quality isn’t quite what I want it to be, but I’ve seen other people have nice looking screencasts so I think it must be either my video card or my video driver.

This line can be amended some for better quality, performance, and add sound recording. Using the raw, lossless codecs for video and audio improves processor usage for better FPS recording:

ffmpeg -f x11grab -s wxga -i :0.0 -vcodec huffyuv -sameq -acodec pcm_s16le -f alsa -i pulse -ac 2 screencast.avi
  • -s and -i are for size and input. -s will give the dimensions and -i will define the co-ordinates. wxga is a definition of a video resolution standard (available ones are listed in man ffmpeg)
  • -r can be added to define the frame rate. Default is 25 and is good. Only reason really to change it is if frames are dropped during recording (marked with red).
  • -follow_mouse 100 can be added to follow mouse movements. 100 is the border in pixels that must be reached before the area is moved.

ffcast and FFmpeg

ffcast is a program that grabs and passes X.org server dimensions and co-rodinates to other programs. It has built-in support to pass these parameters for some programs including ffmpeg. So the command will now look like this:

ffcast -s ffmpeg -- -vcodec huffyuv -sameq -acodec pcm_s16le -f alsa -i pulse -ac 2 screencast.avi

ffcast’s -s option will prompt for the screen area and then pass the dimensions and co-orodinates to ffmpeg using --.

Now to make this easy, I put this in a bash script, it runs as such:

 screencast <a|f|m|w> - create screencasts (a)rea (f)ull-screen (m)ouse (w)indow

Here’s the bash script:

An example:

Disk and Memory Usage Scripts

At times I like to check my levels of disk and memory usage and it’s more available for me at times for me to do it from the command line. Therefore, I created two scripts for them:

$ devtop 
Filesystem  Size  Used  Avail  Use%  Mounted
/dev/sda1   291G  101G  187G   36%   /
/dev/sda2   166G   38G  121G   24%   /home

$ memtop
PROGRAM          %MEM  #MEM
firefox          14.0  1049.7 MiB
gnome-shell      2.2   165.84 MiB
thunderbird      1.9   143.773 MiB
gedit            0.8   63.8555 MiB
nautilus         0.6   44.9961 MiB
Xorg             0.5   38.5039 MiB
gnome-terminal-  0.3   28.8164 MiB
keepassx         0.3   27.6406 MiB
tracker-extract  0.2   21.1992 MiB

Both script are part of my genscripts-git that is in the Arch Linux User Repository.

Regular videos convert for PSP viewing



I like to put videos on my PSP` to watch later. To be able to remember the options I put this in a bash script.

pspvidconv [-d*] <dir.*> <video(s)> — convert videos to PSP

The PSP allows the creation/use of a supplementary single-depth directory. The directory option (-d) will ask if the user wants to create a new directory, if the answer is no, it will present the existing folders.

#!/usr/bin/bash
# Convert videos to PSP

# Settings
vid_dir=/run/media/$USER/PSP/VIDEO  # For Gnome 3, Gnome 2: /media/PSP/VIDEO
vid_vcd="-vcodec mpeg4 -vtag xvid"  # Video codec: xvid
vid_vcd="-vcodec libx264"           # Video codec: x264
vid_vcd="-vcodec h264"
vid_res=320x240                     # 320x240 for PSP 1001, 480x272 for 2001
vid_vbr=768k                        # Video bit rate, was 1024
vid_vfr=29.97                       # Video frame rate
vid_acd=aac                         # Audio codec to use (libfaac for some)
vid_aab=64k                         # Audio bit rate
vid_aar=48000                       # Audio sampling frequency
vid_aac=2                           # Audio number of channels
fns_snd=/usr/share/sounds/alsa/Front_Center.wav

# Usage
if [[ -z "$@" ]]; then
  echo "${0##*/} [-d*] <dir.*> <video(s)> — convert videos to PSP"
  exit
fi

# Check that PSP is plugged in
if [ ! -d $vid_dir ]; then
  echo "It appears that the PSP is not plugged in, no "$vid_dir"."
  exit
fi

# Use sub-directory
if [ "$1" == "-d" ]; then
  while true; do
    read -p " Create a new directory? (y/n): " yn
    case $yn in
      [Yy] )  read -p " Directory name (no spaces): " newdir
              vid_dir="$vid_dir"/"$newdir"
              mkdir "$vid_dir" && break 2;;
      [Nn] )  printf " Select PSP VIDEO sub-directory:n"
              select vid_sub in "$vid_dir"/*/
                do
                  vid_dir="$vid_sub"
                  test -n "$vid_dir" && break 2
                  echo " Select 1, 2, ..."
                done ;;
      * )     echo " Answer (y)es or (n)o."
    esac
  done
  shift
fi

# Check if selection(s) exists
for vid in "$@"; do
  if [ ! -f "$vid" ]; then
    echo " Selection ""$vid"" does not exist."
    exit
  fi
done

# Convert, save to PSP video directory
for vid in "$@"; do
  vid_out="${vid/:/-}"            # ffmpeg not allowing outputs of ':', '?'
  vid_out="${vid_out/?/}"        # http://tinyurl.com/ffmpeg-filename-colon
  #vid_out="${vid_out%.*}"-PSP.mp4 # Append '-PSP' to filename
  thm_out="${vid_out%.*}".thm
  # Encode video
  ffmpeg -i file:"$vid" $(printf '%s' "$vid_vcd") -s "$vid_res" -b:v "$vid_vbr" -r "$vid_vfr" -acodec "$vid_acd" -b:a "$vid_aab" -ar "$vid_aar" -ac "$vid_aac" -f psp -strict -2 -y "$vid_dir"/"$vid_out"
  # Create thumbnail
  ffmpeg -i file:"$vid" -f image2 -ss 50 -vframes 1 -s 160x120 "$vid_dir"/"$thm_out"
done && aplay "$fns_snd"

Markdown to WordPress Format

WordPress understand Markdown format now, so this post is obsolete.

When I discovered MarkDown I was in love, it was very nice to discover an easy, clean, well-thought-out markup language. I wanted a way to be able take my detailed notes, have them easy to read, and then to be able post them here on the blog that would be in a nice WordPress format. Yesterday, I wrote about discovering pandoc which enables a person to write in markdown and have it converted to HTML. To be able to use the HTML code created by pandoc in WordPress it needed to be slightly edited and cleaned up. Therefore,… I created a bash script for it.

Example conversion from MarkDown format to WordPress format

It works pretty good. Basically it removes tags for paragraphs (<p>), cleans up code blocks, improves formating, as well as doing a few other things. I haven’t gone through all permutations that pandoc conversion can do so a few thing swill be left out, but otherwise it should work for most things. If anything needs to be added please let me know.

Download Package Source Files

I wanted a way to easily download source files for quick editing. Sure abs and numerous AUR-helpers do it but I wanted a simple all-together program/script that could do it, and it turned out to be pretty easy. I wanted to be able to define the repository, and then the package and I did it!

pacpull extra/a52dec

aur/ can be used here as well as the other repositories. I set up /etc/abs.conf and $XDG_CONFIG_HOME/cower/config to use my pkgbuilds directory ~/.arch/pkgbuild (ABSROOT="/home/todd/.arch/pkgbuild", TargetDir = /home/todd/.arch/pkgbuild/aur respectively) so it looks pretty nice:

ls
aur  extra  own  testing

If the repository is wrong it will list the available repositories:

pacpull extar/a52dec
 Not a valid repository:
  core
  extra
  community
  multilib
  testing
  community-testing
  multilib-testing

And it’s nice and it’s basic:

makepkg Shortcuts Script

This one is not as important as the pacman related script but I find I use it often too. I maintain several packages in the AUR and it comes in handy to quickly refer to common tasks related to makepkg. The md5sum function still needs a bit of work (i.e. it requires the build function in the PKGBUILD be able to place the md5sums nicely). Otherwise it’s pretty ready. Here’s what it does:

 mp <option> - common makepkg building tasks
  b - build package (install dependencies if required)
  m - update md5sums
  r - remove previous build directories
  s - create source files for upload, prompts for submission to the AUR
  t - create PKGBUILD template

(ar)ch (pa)ckages – a generic package tasks script for Arch Linux

I once saw a wrapper-script for pacman in the forums that was basically a short-hand version of common pacman tasks. I thought this was a good idea and over the last couple years, I’ve expanded on it. It does just about everything I need it to. It’s real basic and I call it arpa. Here is a basic synopsis:

arpa [option] [*package] - a generic package tasks wrapper script
  -e, --explicit - install a package as explicit
  -g, --get      - get/download package upgrade(s)    : -G get pkg upgrades all
  -i, --install  - install a package                  : -I install as dependency
  -l, --list     - list package files                 : -L list pkgs installed
  -o, --owns     - owning package of a file
  -q, --query    - query for an installed package     : -Q query w/ description
  -r, --remove   - remove a pkg and its deps          : -R force, no argue orphs
  -s, --search   - search for a package               : -S search w/ description
  -u, --upgrade  - upgrade system                     : -U upgrade AUR
  -y, --sync     - sync package db

Good for me to have this around so I can remember everything :), and it is in the AUR.

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