gt—create a gedit scratchpad


I am really lazy with my editors. I have aliases in my shell configuration for gedit and vim to open them as quickly as possible:

alias v="vim -p"
alias sv="sudo vim -p"
alias g="bgcmd gedit"
alias sg="bgcmd gksudo geany"

This is very nice for me because I use my editors quite a bit. One thing I needed though was a command that would create and open a temporary file in gedit. The main reason for this is that, there are times, I don’t know how to name or place the file properly yet. At other times, the reason is, I like to have a scratchpad that would save information that I might forget if it was just a new file and I forgot about it or a crash happened.

The bash script

Running gt will create and open a file named with the current time (MMDDhhmm) and will be saved in the trash folder. If gt is followed by a name (e.g. gt the name will be appended to the time.


The name is helpful if wanting to dig the file out of the trash folder at a later time.

# (g)edit (t)emp. file — create gedit scratchpad

tme_day=$(date +%m%d%H%M)

[ ! -d "$tmp_dir" ] && mkdir -pv "$tmp_dir"

# gedit existence test
hash gedit 2>&- || { echo "Requires program \"gedit\"."; exit 1; }

# Usage
if [ "$1" = -h -o "$1" = --help ]; then
  echo "${0##*/} [name1] [name2*] — create a gedit scratchpad"
  exit 2

if [ "$1" ]; then
  for name in "$@"; do
    nohup gedit "$tmp_dir"/"$tme_day"-"$name" &> /dev/null &
  nohup gedit "$tmp_dir"/"$tme_day" &> /dev/null &

xuserrun—run a command as the currently active server user

xuserrun is a bash script to detect the first server environmental values, these values are then used to transmit a command to it. The script is primarily useful from another environment: a different user, from the tty console, from cron, a boot script…. xuserrun requires systemd.

Running it is basic:

xuserrun xclock -digital

Another example:

xuserrun notify-send "Remember to get bread."

I have put it in its own repository.

Disk and Memory Usage Scripts

At times I like to check my levels of disk and memory usage and it’s more available for me at times for me to do it from the command line. Therefore, I created two scripts for them:

$ devtop 
Filesystem  Size  Used  Avail  Use%  Mounted
/dev/sda1   291G  101G  187G   36%   /
/dev/sda2   166G   38G  121G   24%   /home

$ memtop
PROGRAM          %MEM  #MEM
firefox          14.0  1049.7 MiB
gnome-shell      2.2   165.84 MiB
thunderbird      1.9   143.773 MiB
gedit            0.8   63.8555 MiB
nautilus         0.6   44.9961 MiB
Xorg             0.5   38.5039 MiB
gnome-terminal-  0.3   28.8164 MiB
keepassx         0.3   27.6406 MiB
tracker-extract  0.2   21.1992 MiB

Both script are part of my genscripts-git that is in the Arch Linux User Repository.

Regular videos convert for PSP viewing

I like to put videos on my PSP` to watch later. To be able to remember the options I put this in a bash script.

pspvidconv [-d*] <dir.*> <video(s)> — convert videos to PSP

The PSP allows the creation/use of a supplementary single-depth directory. The directory option (-d) will ask if the user wants to create a new directory, if the answer is no, it will present the existing folders.

# Convert videos to PSP

# Settings
vid_dir=/run/media/$USER/PSP/VIDEO  # For Gnome 3, Gnome 2: /media/PSP/VIDEO
vid_vcd="-vcodec mpeg4 -vtag xvid"  # Video codec: xvid
vid_vcd="-vcodec libx264"           # Video codec: x264
vid_vcd="-vcodec h264"
vid_res=320x240                     # 320x240 for PSP 1001, 480x272 for 2001
vid_vbr=768k                        # Video bit rate, was 1024
vid_vfr=29.97                       # Video frame rate
vid_acd=aac                         # Audio codec to use (libfaac for some)
vid_aab=64k                         # Audio bit rate
vid_aar=48000                       # Audio sampling frequency
vid_aac=2                           # Audio number of channels

# Usage
if [[ -z "$@" ]]; then
  echo "${0##*/} [-d*] <dir.*> <video(s)> — convert videos to PSP"

# Check that PSP is plugged in
if [ ! -d $vid_dir ]; then
  echo "It appears that the PSP is not plugged in, no "$vid_dir"."

# Use sub-directory
if [ "$1" == "-d" ]; then
  while true; do
    read -p " Create a new directory? (y/n): " yn
    case $yn in
      [Yy] )  read -p " Directory name (no spaces): " newdir
              mkdir "$vid_dir" && break 2;;
      [Nn] )  printf " Select PSP VIDEO sub-directory:n"
              select vid_sub in "$vid_dir"/*/
                  test -n "$vid_dir" && break 2
                  echo " Select 1, 2, ..."
                done ;;
      * )     echo " Answer (y)es or (n)o."

# Check if selection(s) exists
for vid in "$@"; do
  if [ ! -f "$vid" ]; then
    echo " Selection ""$vid"" does not exist."

# Convert, save to PSP video directory
for vid in "$@"; do
  vid_out="${vid/:/-}"            # ffmpeg not allowing outputs of ':', '?'
  vid_out="${vid_out/?/}"        #
  #vid_out="${vid_out%.*}"-PSP.mp4 # Append '-PSP' to filename
  # Encode video
  ffmpeg -i file:"$vid" $(printf '%s' "$vid_vcd") -s "$vid_res" -b:v "$vid_vbr" -r "$vid_vfr" -acodec "$vid_acd" -b:a "$vid_aab" -ar "$vid_aar" -ac "$vid_aac" -f psp -strict -2 -y "$vid_dir"/"$vid_out"
  # Create thumbnail
  ffmpeg -i file:"$vid" -f image2 -ss 50 -vframes 1 -s 160x120 "$vid_dir"/"$thm_out"
done && aplay "$fns_snd"

(ar)ch (pa)ckages – a generic package tasks script for Arch Linux

I once saw a wrapper-script for pacman in the forums that was basically a short-hand version of common pacman tasks. I thought this was a good idea and over the last couple years, I’ve expanded on it. It does just about everything I need it to. It’s real basic and I call it arpa. Here is a basic synopsis:

arpa [option] [*package] - a generic package tasks wrapper script
  -e, --explicit - install a package as explicit
  -g, --get      - get/download package upgrade(s)    : -G get pkg upgrades all
  -i, --install  - install a package                  : -I install as dependency
  -l, --list     - list package files                 : -L list pkgs installed
  -o, --owns     - owning package of a file
  -q, --query    - query for an installed package     : -Q query w/ description
  -r, --remove   - remove a pkg and its deps          : -R force, no argue orphs
  -s, --search   - search for a package               : -S search w/ description
  -u, --upgrade  - upgrade system                     : -U upgrade AUR
  -y, --sync     - sync package db

Good for me to have this around so I can remember everything :), and it is in the AUR.

Syntax Highlighting in Blog Posts with Vim

Update: Reader Elder Marco has pointed out that does have support for syntax highlighting of source code built-in (which I had never heard of before) that might be a preferred alternative for some. An example of both is below.

Vim is a great all-around editor, it also does very good at syntax highlighting. With the plugin “TOhtml” included with Vim it’s easy to put that highlighting into a blog post. I created a blogscrpt bash script that when run on another script will produce a file defining the syntax highlighting in HTML code. From there it can be pasted into the blog post.

blogscrpt syntax highlighting:

# Create HTML code from Vim syntax highlighting (for use in coloring scripts)

scrpt=${0##*/}  # filename of script

# Display usage if no parameters given
if [[ -z "$@" ]]; then
  echo " $scrpt <filename> - create HTML code from Vim syntax highlighting"

# Syntax highlighting to HTML export
vim -f  +"syntax on"                  \
        +"set background=$background" \
        +"colorscheme $colorscheme"   \
        +"let html_use_css = 0"       \
        +"let html_no_pre = 1"        \
        +"let html_number_lines = 0"  \
        +"TOhtml"                     \
        +"x"                          \
        +"q" $filename

# Clean up HTML code
tidy -utf8 -f /dev/null --wrap -m $filename.html

# Delete the HTML meta page information.
sed -i '1,/body bgcolor=/d' $filename.html

# Remove line breaks (needed for some things like blog posts)
sed -i 's|<br>||g' $filename.html

# Remove the closing HTML tags
sed -i 's~</body[^>]*>~~g' $filename.html
sed -i 's~</html[^>]*>~~g' $filename.html

# Add preformatting tabs <pre> and </pre>
#sed -i '1 i <pre>' $filename.html
#sed -i '$ a </pre>' $filename.html

# Remove trailing blank lines
while [ "$(tail -n 1 $filename.html)" == "\n" ]; do
  sed -i '$d' $filename.html

# Delete newline of last <font> line for better formatting
sed -i ':a;N;$!ba;s/\(.*\)\n/\1/' $filename.html
sed -i ':a;N;$!ba;s/\(.*\)\n/\1/' $filename.html

# Delete final newline
perl -i -e 'local $/; $_ = <>; s/\n$//; print' $filename.html

WordPress built-in syntax highlight support example:

# Create HTML code from Vim syntax highlighting (for use in coloring scripts)

scrpt=${0##*/}  # filename of script

# Display usage if no parameters given
if [[ -z "$@" ]]; then
  echo " $scrpt <filename> - create HTML code from Vim syntax highlighting"

# Syntax highlighting to HTML export
vim -f  +"syntax on"                  \
        +"set background=$background" \
        +"colorscheme $colorscheme"   \
        +"let html_use_css = 0"       \
        +"let html_no_pre = 1"        \
        +"let html_number_lines = 0"  \
        +"TOhtml"                     \
        +"x"                          \
        +"q" $filename

# Clean up HTML code
tidy -utf8 -f /dev/null --wrap -m $filename.html

# Delete the HTML meta page information.
sed -i '1,/body bgcolor=/d' $filename.html

# Remove line breaks (needed for some things like blog posts)
sed -i 's|<br>||g' $filename.html

# Remove the closing HTML tags
sed -i 's~</body[^>]*>~~g' $filename.html
sed -i 's~</html[^>]*>~~g' $filename.html

# Add preformatting tabs <pre> and </pre>
#sed -i '1 i <pre>' $filename.html
#sed -i '$ a </pre>' $filename.html

# Remove trailing blank lines
while [ "$(tail -n 1 $filename.html)" == "\n" ]; do
  sed -i '$d' $filename.html

# Delete newline of last <font> line for better formatting
sed -i ':a;N;$!ba;s/\(.*\)\n/\1/' $filename.html
sed -i ':a;N;$!ba;s/\(.*\)\n/\1/' $filename.html

# Delete final newline
perl -i -e 'local $/; $_ = <>; s/\n$//; print' $filename.html

DisplaySize in xorg.conf… uhgg!

Update: This turns out to be done by xrandr which the server hands off to now for dynamic use of monitors. man xrandr even reports that it is trying to keepaconstant DPI. Not sure just why it is doing it, but found a good way to get it done.

I just got a new monitor to be able to use as an external monitor for my laptop. While I was setting it up I noticed that the monitors display size wasn’t correctly detected. The Xorg server does a good job auto-configuring however this caught my eye:

xdpyinfo | grep -B2 resolution
dimensions:    1920x1080 pixels (508x286 millimeters)
resolution:    96x96 dots per inch

The monitor I got is a 21.5″ monitor so I figured the DPI was off. I decided to calculate it myself (this is a square pixel monitor):

res_diag=$(echo "scale=5;sqrt($res_horz^2+$res_vert^2)" | bc)
siz_horz=$(echo "scale=5;($siz_diag/$res_diag)*$res_horz*25.4" | bc)
siz_vert=$(echo "scale=5;($siz_diag/$res_diag)*$res_vert*25.4" | bc)
echo "$siz_horz"x"$siz_vert"

Also there are online DPI Calculators conferred by doubt (1, 2,) and xrandr:

em_ds_h=$(xrandr | grep VGA-0 | rev | cut -d " " -f 3 | rev | sed 's/mm//')
em_ds_v=$(xrandr | grep VGA-0 | rev | cut -d " " -f 1 | rev | sed 's/mm//')
echo $em_ds

My discovered value and theirs are a couple millimeters off overall so I just used theirs. I created a configuration to define the display size to the the Xorg server. A basic configuration to define display size can be done like this:

cat /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d/90-monitor-disp-size.conf
Section "Monitor"
  Identifier "<default monitor>"
  DisplaySize 477 268

Arch Linux and most distros use /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/. However this won’t work on the external monitor. So I expanded on it (more than it probably needed to be) by defining both monitors and related sections:

Section "Monitor"
  Identifier    "Internal - Pavilion Laptop"
  DisplaySize    304.5 228.6

Section "Monitor"
  Identifier    "External - Samsung Syncmaster SA350"
  VendorName    "Samsung"
  ModelName     "SA300/SA350"
  DisplaySize    476 267.7

Section "Device"
  Identifier    "ATI Radeon Mobility IGP 330M"
  Option        "Monitor-VGA-0"  "External - Samsung Syncmaster SA350"
  Option        "Monitor-LVDS"   "Internal - Pavilion Laptop"

Section "Screen"
  Identifier    "Default Screen"
  Monitor       "Internal - Pavilion Laptop"

Section "ServerLayout"
  Identifier    "Default Layout"
  Screen        "Default Screen"

I added VendorName and ModelName but I’m not sure they uniquely define the monitor so that the Xorg server acknowledges them. The VendorName I believe is just for reference, ModelName can usually be discovered by doing:

grep "Monitor name" /var/log/Xorg.0.log

Monitor-VGA-0 and Monitor-LVDS define the ports and hence by reference should uniquely define the monitor (xrandr -q shows them and both are found in the Xorg log).

After a bit of research I discovered that there is a good amount of history concerning the Xorg server having a bit of trouble in not being able to correctly discover the display size. I believe this may be related to some drivers. I’ve been told the open-source ATI driver have had problems and read in some other places of other people who have had similar issues. Defining the display size in the configuration and telling the Xorg server not to use the auto-detected value can be done by adding this to the Devices section (for Nvidia drivers use: Option "UseEDID" "FALSE"):

 Option        "NoDDC"

Unfortunately, this didn’t work either and left me completely at a loss. Unsure how to go further to define display size in the the Xorg server configuration I decided to define it through xrandr.

xrandr has an option to define the display size with the --fbmm option:

xrandr --output VGA-0 --auto -fbmm 476x267.7

--auto uses the default/preferred mode of the monitor.